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SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 1994---

 In New York City today, Rudolph Giuliani is sworn in as the city's new mayor. The weather in the city is moderate  and slightly above average for a New Year's Day. The high temperature today will be 43 degrees, but the low is below freezing: just 29 degrees F. The mayor is taking office at a time when crime is high in the city, and in his inaugural speech, he addresses the problem, saying that "enough is enough." He says that he will insist upon a strict enforcement of the law, and that, in fact, New York can become the "capital of the world" by drawing upon its obvious assets as home of the United Nations and the cultural "magnets" of Broadway, the opera, and its fine museums.

                                                                                               STOCK MARKET: As of the close of trading on the New York Stock Exchange on Friday, December 30, 1993, the Dow-Jones Industrial Average stood at 3,834.44, and the NASDAQ Composite Average was at 751.96. Both averages have been rising since the middle of December.

 TECHNOLOGY: At this time, the World Wide Web does not exist as such. The "Internet" is the current state of the computerized communications art. Gopher is the leading means of communicating from one computer or local network to another; ftp and telnet are other means to the same end. As of last year there were 250 network servers in operation, but interest in the "net" is rapidly growing, and  by the end of this year (1994) there will be ten times as many (2,500) such servers in operation. Commercially, neither the Internet nor the still-to-be-established World Wide Web are in wide use. At this time the preferred means for large companies to interact with their customers is by telephone, using the ubiquitous "1-800" number. Nearly every advertisement by such companies in current issues of TIME magazine carries such a number; none display a "Web Site" address.

A growing problem for the computer industry at this time is the matter of software piracy: the unauthorized duplication of programs.  With some 25 million users estimated to be hooked up to the Internet at this time, in over 90 countries around the world, the potential market for such bootleg merchandise is great. Legitimate software producers are taking steps to crack down on the pirates.